Writing a catchy PhD thesis introduction chapter

Introduction is a very vital part of the written material. Whether you write an essay, a speech, a book or a thesis paper it is very important to have an introduction. This is the part where you present your topic and give your reader an overview of what will you be discussing in the rest of your work.

The basic structure of an introduction

You should begin an introduction with a clear and definitive statement about your subject. First you introduce your subject and then gradually bring the reader to the point or question you will be dealing with. You do not have to explain all the subject in detail just present an overview and proceed to your topic.

The background

This is where you will give your reader a background of the topic. You will show them why is it important and how has been it been dealt with before. You present the previous research on the topic and show how others have considered it.

The gap

The second step is to identify the gap in the previous research. You must be able to tell why you think this topic needed attention and where do the previous researchers lack in addressing the subject. This is the part where you have to raise a question or identify a problem that you will be basing the rest of your thesis upon.

Your approach

This is the last part of the introduction where you have to present your idea of the concerned subject. This is where you will tell the reader that what you think of this problem and how in your opinion it could be solved. It is very important to provide a realistic solution that you can prove in rest of your thesis.

The hook

An introduction is very important part of the thesis as it forms the base of the complete research work. A catchy introduction should be able to engage the reader and make him want to learn more about the topic. This is what we call placing the hook in a writer terminology. The hook is the catch or the element that builds curiosity. Never reveal too much of information in the start let it be a mystery. If you give the reader everything in the beginning he will simply take it for granted and move away from your paper.